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Authentic Indian Chai

I lived in India and Nepal and traveled through Bhutan, Sikkim and Darjeeling, and got used to drinking “masala cha” or Indian spiced chai many times per day. Today is an at home snow day and what better treat but to make a giant pot of warm tea to keep on hand! There are a lot of things that claim to be authentic chai, sold in modern coffee shops, Starbucks and even some ready-made ones like Bhakti chai, in all honesty not one of them are even slightly reminiscent of what Indians really drink. However I’ve cracked the code and found the most authentic recipe and this one is even dairy free and sugar free but still really sweet, light and creamy, and.. spicy!

 

How to Make Indian Chai

Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 5 minutes
Yield: Makes about 6 cups of masala chai- 6 servings.
Tools: A tea strainer, a pot with a spout, a thermos
Spicy and sweet and absolutely authentic!

For the chai:

  • 1 cup milk extra creamy oat milk
  • 5 cups water
  • 3T monkfruit sugar
  • 5T loose black Indian tea leaves
  • 1 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (or sub. 1/2 tsp clove)
  • 1 tsp powered nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper (yes black pepper)
  • 1/4 tsp powered ginger

Chai ingredients

Directions:

  1. Boil the water in a deep stock or saucepan, if it has a spout, that’s best.
  2. Pour all ingredients except the tea.
  3. Place over medium heat.
  4. Allow to heat until small bubbles appear around the perimeter of the water and milk.
  5. When the water and milk comes to a boil, pour in the tea leaves and turn off the heat and stir well.
  6. Allow to steep for about 5 minutes off of the burner.
  7. Do not cook the tea on heat.
  8. Strain carefully into a thermos, and serve!

chai pot

Additional Notes:

Craft your own individual tea based on taste. Some people like it’s sweeter, some people like it spicier than some people like to omit the pepper and ginger. The traditional recipe calls for whole milk and regular sugar, which of course you can substitute if you want to have it taste exactly like it tastes in India and Nepal. These herbs, in Tibetan medicine have a deeply nutritive effect as well as being flavorful. Cheers!

strain chai

Indian Chai

Authentic Indian Chai

Authentic Indian Chai Tea-Sugar and Dairy Free

I lived in India and Nepal and traveled through Bhutan, Sikkim and Darjeeling, and got used to drinking "masala cha" or Indian spiced chai many times per day. Today is an at home snow day and what better treat but to make a giant pot of warm tea to keep on hand! There are a lot of things that claim to be authentic chai, sold in modern coffee shops, Starbucks and even some ready-made ones like Bhakti chai, in all honesty not one of them are even slightly reminiscent of what Indians really drink. However I've cracked the code and found the most authentic recipe and this one is even dairy free and sugar free but still really sweet, light and creamy, and.. spicy!

Equipment

  • Prep: 10 minutes
  • Cook: 5 minutes
  • Yield: Makes about 6 cups of masala chai- 6 servings.
  • Tools: A tea strainer, a pot with a spout, a thermos
  • Spicy and sweet and absolutely authentic!

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup milk extra creamy oat milk
  • 5 cups water
  • 3 T monkfruit sugar
  • 5 T loose black Indian tea leaves
  • 1 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice or sub. 1/2 tsp clove
  • 1 tsp powered nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper yes black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp powered ginger

Instructions
 

  • Boil the water in a deep stock or saucepan, if it has a spout, that's best.
  • Pour all ingredients except the tea.
  • Place over medium heat.
  • Allow to heat until small bubbles appear around the perimeter of the water and milk.
  • When the water and milk comes to a boil, pour in the tea leaves and turn off the heat and stir well.
  • Allow to steep for about 5 minutes off of the burner.
  • Do not cook the tea on heat.
  • Strain carefully into a thermos, and serve!

Notes

Craft your own individual tea based on taste. Some people like it's sweeter, some people like it spicier than some people like to omit the pepper and ginger. The traditional recipe calls for whole milk and regular sugar, which of course you can substitute if you want to have it taste exactly like it tastes in India and Nepal. These herbs, in Tibetan medicine have a deeply nutritive effect as well as being flavorful. Cheers!